Put Customers at the Center of Internal NPS Communication

Put Customers at the Center of Internal NPS Communication

NPS BASICS AND BEYOND
Put Customers at the Center of Internal NPS Communication
Guiding Internal NPS Communication

Put Customers at the Center
of Internal NPS Communication

key takeaway

For effective internal NPS communication, tie in operational data, financial results, customer stories, and even customers themselves. Traditionally briefings to internal staff include customer feedback results and prioritize customer improvement requests. Increasingly such briefings include relevant operational data and demonstrate tie-in to financial results. Why do executives try to let the data alone tell the story? Why not invite customers to deliver key messages themselves?

Best Practice

Most companies have a simple answer to the question of how often a customer has presented in staff meetings, major internal events, all-employee calls and webinars: Never.

Many of those same companies probably have a slogan like “We put customers at the center of everything we do” posted on a virtual or real wall somewhere. Why such a disconnect? It comes about partly because customers fall into the category of things that are extremely important but not extremely urgent.

The best way to make customers into a “top of mind” issue is to ensure they can talk to your teams directly. This is far less difficult than you might think, because customers like doing it. Customers of B2B companies are especially willing, because senior decision-makers may even have bet their personal reputations on your success. They want and need you to do what you have promised.

Start with personal presence at your larger gatherings. Ask customers to speak about their experience with your company and what they would like you to do better. Share those stories – video is great, but quotes can be powerful too. You’re likely to find employees quoting your invitees months later.

Customer experience programs must be data-driven to uncover reliable insights and directions. But for communicating about those insights, there’s not substitute for having customers in their own words reinforce what your data is telling you. It brings a human touch to the data that stays with your teams long after the charts and graphs are simply a vague memory.

Parting advice: Because stories are so memorable, choose them wisely so they reinforce your data-driven insights and drive the appropriate action.

go beyond
basic nps communication

Good habits about NPS communication will set you up for long-term success. Even so, you can only get so much out of the act of communication until you have the kinds of data, analysis, actions, and outcomes that will really hold the attention of your customers and internal stakeholders. As you build out better data and analysis, and as your programs becomes more nuanced and sophisticated, be ready to adjust your communication strategy. To get there, download our guide, take our comprehensive training course, or read about the future of NPS.

REPORT

The Complete Guide to NPS Basics and Beyond

TRAINING

Leading an Outcome- Oriented
CX Program

REPORT

The New NPS
Manifesto

REPORT

The Complete Guide to NPS Basics and Beyond

TRAINING

Leading an Outcome- Oriented
CX Program

REPORT

The New NPS Manifesto

ABOUT OCX COGNITION

OCX Cognition delivers the future of NPS. We ensure customer experience success by combining technology and data science with programmatic consulting. In our Insights section, we present a comprehensive and evolving collection of resources based on our research and expertise, collected for CX leaders committed to delivering business outcomes.

Put Customers at the Center of Internal NPS Communication

Use Emotional Stories to Drive Executive Engagement with NPS Insights

NPS BASICS AND BEYOND
Use Emotional Stories to Drive Executive Engagement with NPS Insights
Communicating NPS Results to Executives

Use Emotional Stories to Drive Executive Engagement with NPS Insights

key takeaway

Communicating NPS insights to executives requires relevance. Consider how your CX report will help them achieve strategic goals, and appeal to both rationality and emotion.

Best Practice

Traditional approaches to communicating NPS insights tend to be almost totally ineffective with senior executives. We’ll look at what’s all too common and advise on a better approach.

In typical reporting to executives, CX leaders provide color-coded scorecards that show how each business is doing. External comparisons are rare. Suggestions about how to improve negative trends are even more rare. The data sources are limited and the focus on numbers is excessive. Senior executives who see a series of red-coded data for their department simply delete the email, as it has no effect on their day-to-day work or future plans.

Let’s look instead at a good data-driven approach, followed by a great story-based approach.

For a data-driven approach, we’ll take the example of a company that sells security software. A traditional approach to CX reporting would simply be to provide the NPS trends and the top improvement suggestions made by customers. Good, but not good enough. A modern approach is to combine this with operational data. Show the new account activation trends for the SaaS version of the software. Show the number of data intrusion attempts and breaches by product. Cover the financial value of contract renewals, compared to the prior month or quarter. In other words, combine CX data with the information leaders use to manage their business on a daily basis.

That is a good approach to management, but not yet a great approach to communication. Making it real for executives requires stories. It requires input from people they recognize. The most powerful stories are those that come from customers. Let’s suppose that your security software company is starting to see a new type of attack and that clients’ customer data has indeed been stolen. You could begin your CX report to senior leaders with a quote from a customer who has been a victim of the new attack. A video interview would be better still. Stories help to make the following information personal and emotional.

Our rational selves want to believe that data and scorecards should be enough. But emotion-generating customer stories are a more effective method of grabbing the attention of senior leaders and getting potential actions to the top of their priority lists.

go beyond
basic nps communication

Good habits about NPS communication will set you up for long-term success. Even so, you can only get so much out of the act of communication until you have the kinds of data, analysis, actions, and outcomes that will really hold the attention of your customers and internal stakeholders. As you build out better data and analysis, and as your programs becomes more nuanced and sophisticated, be ready to adjust your communication strategy. To get there, download our guide, take our comprehensive training course, or read about the future of NPS.

REPORT

The Complete Guide to NPS Basics and Beyond

TRAINING

Leading an Outcome- Oriented
CX Program

REPORT

The New NPS
Manifesto

REPORT

The Complete Guide to NPS Basics and Beyond

TRAINING

Leading an Outcome- Oriented
CX Program

REPORT

The New NPS Manifesto

ABOUT OCX COGNITION

OCX Cognition delivers the future of NPS. We ensure customer experience success by combining technology and data science with programmatic consulting. In our Insights section, we present a comprehensive and evolving collection of resources based on our research and expertise, collected for CX leaders committed to delivering business outcomes.

Put Customers at the Center of Internal NPS Communication

Communicating with customers before and after surveys

NPS BASICS AND BEYOND
Communicating with customers before and after surveys

Survey Related Customer Communications

Communicating With Customers
Before and After Surveys

key takeaway

NPS survey processes are wonderful opportunities to make promises to customers and then keep them. Use them to enhance your credibility and boost survey response rates.

Best Practice

Customer communication about surveys should be as personal as possible. Best practice is to include three elements:

  • Tell your customers what you are going to do with survey feedback
  • Analyze the results
  • Tell customers what improvements you have already made what improvements are being planned based on their input.

Let’s jump straight into an example. Here’s a sample of an email sent just prior to a survey invitation, setting expectations for the whole process of interacting with customer surveys.

Dear Mr. Jones,

My name is Robert Altman. I am the product manager for the EZ-Clean Warehouse Robot that you have been leasing from us for the last nine months. My team and I are now working on the next versions of both the software and hardware and need your help prioritizing our work. Please watch your email tomorrow morning. I will send you another email with a four-question survey about your experience so far and what you would like us to improve. I promise to write back to let you know what we have learned from you and customers like you, together with a list of the improvements we plan to make.

Thank you in advance for your contribution. It is important to me personally, and to the EZ-Clean team as a whole.

The customer then gets the survey request, from the same sender. Once the company has digested the responses and decided what to do, Robert Altman again writes back to all clients (not just those who have responded) with a summary of what the company learned from customer feedback, including the priority action list. Including non-respondents demonstrates your commitment to action and inspires more customers to respond to future surveys.

Very few companies communicate back to customers to explain what they have learned and outline their plan of action. (It’s no wonder survey response rates are low.) Luckily, following this best practice gives your program a chance to stand out. You then reap the rewards of a survey process your customers see as an ongoing dialog between your organization and them.

go beyond
basic nps communication

Good habits about NPS communication will set you up for long-term success. Even so, you can only get so much out of the act of communication until you have the kinds of data, analysis, actions, and outcomes that will really hold the attention of your customers and internal stakeholders. As you build out better data and analysis, and as your programs becomes more nuanced and sophisticated, be ready to adjust your communication strategy. To get there, download our guide, take our comprehensive training course, or read about the future of NPS.

REPORT

The Complete Guide to NPS Basics and Beyond

TRAINING

Leading an Outcome- Oriented
CX Program

REPORT

The New NPS
Manifesto

REPORT

The Complete Guide to NPS Basics and Beyond

TRAINING

Leading an Outcome- Oriented
CX Program

REPORT

The New NPS Manifesto

ABOUT OCX COGNITION

OCX Cognition delivers the future of NPS. We ensure customer experience success by combining technology and data science with programmatic consulting. In our Insights section, we present a comprehensive and evolving collection of resources based on our research and expertise, collected for CX leaders committed to delivering business outcomes.

Put Customers at the Center of Internal NPS Communication

Define Your NPS Program as a Competitive Advantage

NPS BASICS AND BEYOND
Define Your NPS Program as a Competitive Advantage
NPS Program Scope

Define Your NPS Program
as a Competitive Advantage

key takeaway

NPS program objectives, scope, and initiatives must be clear, externally oriented, and designed to help your company to win.

Best Practice

Often companies have no formal CX strategy statement at all to govern their NPS program. However, most have a clear set of work that the CX leader and team are expected to do, often focused on a set of studies and reports they have to produce. While such guidance may be helpful, the purpose of an NPS program cannot be understood as the production of report cards. It must be the defeat of your competitors.

There is a general expectation that such reports will stimulate people to act, but how such action would arise is rarely documented. This comes primarily from a traditional view of CX which is that surveys identify the places fires are burning, then appropriate people spontaneously run to put out the fires. This is simply not good enough.

Best practice is to document and communicate:

  • What is going on and how it is changing
  • Strategic choices available
  • The top implementation priorities.

Communicating all of this internally is critical to obtaining the sponsorship and resources needed to be successful. Here’s a bit more detail.

Evaluating the current situation means understanding how well you, your partners, and your competitors are satisfying customers today and how that has been changing. Be sure to think expansively. It is critical to identify new competitors and how they may disrupt things. Government regulation may drive change, as may changes in your industry, often driven by technology.

A team or teams from across your business should evaluate options based on the situation analysis. They then secure the necessary resources. Of course, your company may not be able to implement everything the team suggests.

Communicate the whole process and the top three to five CX-improvement initiatives consistently across the company until they have been completed. When the first initiatives have been completed, start again, continuing the intense communication from the CEO throughout the organization.

This ‘outside-in’ approach ensures regular external focus on what customer experiences are necessary to win in the market. Situating within the framework of market competition motivates the entire organization and provides clarity.

go beyond basic nps communication

Good habits about NPS communication will set you up for long-term success. Even so, you can only get so much out of the act of communication until you have the kinds of data, analysis, actions, and outcomes that will really hold the attention of your customers and internal stakeholders. As you build out better data and analysis, and as your programs becomes more nuanced and sophisticated, be ready to adjust your communication strategy. To get there, download our guide, take our comprehensive training course, or read about the future of NPS.

REPORT

The Complete Guide to NPS Basics and Beyond

TRAINING

Leading an Outcome- Oriented
CX Program

REPORT

The New NPS
Manifesto

REPORT

The Complete Guide to NPS Basics and Beyond

TRAINING

Leading an Outcome- Oriented
CX Program

REPORT

The New NPS Manifesto

ABOUT OCX COGNITION

OCX Cognition delivers the future of NPS. We ensure customer experience success by combining technology and data science with programmatic consulting. In our Insights section, we present a comprehensive and evolving collection of resources based on our research and expertise, collected for CX leaders committed to delivering business outcomes.