Who’s to Blame When Employees Don’t Take Action on NPS?

Who’s to Blame When Employees Don’t Take Action on NPS?

NPS BASICS AND BEYOND
Who’s to Blame When Employees Don’t Take Action on NPS?
Motivating Employees to Act

Who’s to Blame When Employees
Don’t Take Action on NPS?

key takeaway

Your NPS program suffers when employees don’t take action on all the great customer data you’ve given them, but resist the temptation to play the blame game. Start by understanding what underlies the behavior.

Best Practice

The magic formula for getting your employees to act on NPS data is making the behavior both easy to do and something they are motivated to do. Making something easy to do requires two things: process and training. Without prescribed processes, supported through training, inertia takes hold. In such scenarios we often hear comments like, “I’d like to help with improving the customer experience, but I don’t know what to do.”

Yet clear process alone isn’t enough because it doesn’t create motivation. People need to understand the why, the value of the exercise, the impact of what they are doing. Only then will they be motivated to carry out the processes you have laid out for them. Sharing examples of “wins” from taking action is a great motivator. Some examples: The follow up with a client whose needs were not being met revealed an opportunity for an upsell to a better solution; The decision maker for a large software contract was hearing repeated usability complaints from the users and root cause investigation led to a training session that solved the issue.

While many organizations use financial incentives to “motivate” employee behavior, helping employees understand that treating customers well is simply the right thing to do is a more powerful source of motivation. The CX team can play a key role is establishing a customer centric culture throughout your organization.

You will also want to leverage reporting and the use of triggers to further empower your employees to act. It’s not uncommon to see customer feedback data being distributed in a very fragmented way, without clarity and accountability. Keep in mind the reporting needs to be role-relevant, distributed to those who are accountable, and deliver clear direction. Triggers to highlight the urgency to act can be included in reporting distribution to make it even easier for employees to do the right thing.

go beyond taking action with nps data

A strong program based on these fundamental NPS best practices will have robust follow up and clear plans for acting on insights, but your follow up and actions are only as good as the data set you have. Plan now to take your program to the next level by expanding your data set so that you have reliable insight on the complete customer base. For that, you’ll need predictive scoring, or Spectrum NPS. To get there, download our guide, take our comprehensive training course, or read about the future of NPS.

REPORT

The Complete Guide to NPS Basics and Beyond

TRAINING

Leading an Outcome- Oriented
CX Program

REPORT

The New NPS
Manifesto

REPORT

The Complete Guide to NPS Basics and Beyond

TRAINING

Leading an Outcome- Oriented
CX Program

REPORT

The New NPS Manifesto

ABOUT OCX COGNITION

OCX Cognition delivers the future of NPS. We ensure customer experience success by combining technology and data science with programmatic consulting. In our Insights section, we present a comprehensive and evolving collection of resources based on our research and expertise, collected for CX leaders committed to delivering business outcomes.

Who’s to Blame When Employees Don’t Take Action on NPS?

NPS Action Planning for the Greatest Impact

NPS BASICS AND BEYOND
NPS Action Planning for the Greatest Impact

Action Planning

NPS Action Planning
for the Greatest Impact

key takeaway

NPS action planning takes longer than closing the loop, but it also offers greater impact on the business because it lets you address needed functional and cross functional actions.

Best Practice

NPS planning lets you prioritize the business performance issues that impact a large number of customers or a key customer segment. It allows you to go beyond the individually focused work of closing the loop. It is no easy task and where many programs stagnate.

Get your program over the hump by organizing your thinking about what action planning should look like for your business and structuring teams based on areas of expertise, skills and sense of collaboration is a good starting point.

When it comes to functional area and cross functional action planning, we’ve seen organizations where Lean Six Sigma and Kaizen are part of the culture adapt those processes quite well to addressing customer experience improvements. However, that level of sophistication is not required to be successful in action planning.

Here is a simple way to approach action planning:

  • Clearly state the action item
  • Objective
  • Document the background: Why was this action item chosen? What are the analytics supporting impact of this on NPS or OSAT?
  • Business Impact: Provide economic impact
  • Obstacles: Document obstacles to successful execution of improvements
  • Objective: Goal or target
  • Project Plan: Task list or Gantt Chart
  • Result

Creating clear processes is the link that translates data insights into action. It’s the difference we see between programs that merely collect data and programs that deliver real change and the resulting financial gains.

Example

Source: How to Think About Action Planning, OCX Cognition.

go beyond taking action with nps data

A strong program based on these fundamental NPS best practices will have robust follow up and clear plans for acting on insights, but your follow up and actions are only as good as the data set you have. Plan now to take your program to the next level by expanding your data set so that you have reliable insight on the complete customer base. For that, you’ll need predictive scoring, or Spectrum NPS. To get there, download our guide, take our comprehensive training course, or read about the future of NPS.

REPORT

The Complete Guide to NPS Basics and Beyond

TRAINING

Leading an Outcome- Oriented
CX Program

REPORT

The New NPS
Manifesto

REPORT

The Complete Guide to NPS Basics and Beyond

TRAINING

Leading an Outcome- Oriented
CX Program

REPORT

The New NPS Manifesto

ABOUT OCX COGNITION

OCX Cognition delivers the future of NPS. We ensure customer experience success by combining technology and data science with programmatic consulting. In our Insights section, we present a comprehensive and evolving collection of resources based on our research and expertise, collected for CX leaders committed to delivering business outcomes.

Who’s to Blame When Employees Don’t Take Action on NPS?

NPS Closed Loop Keeps the Dialog Open

NPS BASICS AND BEYOND
NPS Closed Loop Keeps the Dialog Open

Closing the Loop

NPS Closed Loop
Keeps the Dialog Open

key takeaway

The NPS closed loop offers an important way to improve the customer relationship and encourage ongoing feedback. It should encompass all types of customer feedback, not just NPS responses.

Best Practice

The concept behind NPS programs is a simple one: Customers speak… the business listens… the business acts. It’s critical that customers understand that you are listening and taking action.

The first level of taking action on NPS feedback (or other survey responses) is “closing the loop,” which means getting back to customers in response to their feedback. Doing so gives you a chance to learn more, solve problems, prevent bad outcomes, and demonstrate your good faith.

We encourage you to think about your closed loop strategy in terms of opportunities:

  • To recover customers at risk of churning
  • To mitigate risk of negative word of mouth
  • To grow through identifying additional sales opportunities
  • To leverage and build relationships; to identify advocates for your brand
  • To compete through a consistent, robust process that distinguishes you from your competition
  • To evolve as an organization where closed loop learnings feed into improvements across teams, processes and systems.

The most successful programs we see exercise what we call 100% closed loop, meaning they follow up with all respondents. Of course, different kinds of conversations are needed with different customers.

Design your process to be specific to the survey and the type of response. Be sure to provide training to those responsible for following up with customers. Most survey tools have the capability to automate a closed loop alert which notifies a pre-determined designated person that a response has been received from a customer that requires a follow up.

Build the following components into your closed loop process:

  • Definition of alert type, e.g. an NPS of 0-6 indicating a Detractor
  • Designated owner: For relationship survey follow up this would ideally be someone who is familiar to the customer and has an ownership stake in the relationship; for transactional follow up someone familiar with the department, e.g. support, delivery, is appropriate. A dispatch method of dispersing alerts can also be effective if a designated owner is not feasible in your organization.
  • Additional individuals who should receive a notification; an FYI that the response has come in, but no action is required of them.
  • Expected time frame for follow up to occur
  • Method of follow up
  • Documentation required
  • Process oversight owner

Train those responding to customer feedback to consider the type of feedback received. For example, for responses to Detractors (on an NPS survey) or those with negative experiences, the focus should be on what went wrong and how you can fix and/or avoid a reoccurrence. In speaking with Passives or mildly negative respondents, spend time reviewing comments, particularly around suggested improvements. Ask open ended questions. Remember that even Promoters and Passives may have some areas of low satisfaction by attribute which you need to better understand.

Conversations with Promoters or those with positive feedback are a great opportunity to strengthen relationships and leverage those relationships to secure testimonials and references. As Promoters can be a great source of ideas for innovation and testing, consider extending them an invitation to join an advisory group.

Example

Source: Closed Loop Workflow Example, OCX Cognition.

go beyond taking action with nps data

A strong program based on these fundamental NPS best practices will have robust follow up and clear plans for acting on insights, but your follow up and actions are only as good as the data set you have. Plan now to take your program to the next level by expanding your data set so that you have reliable insight on the complete customer base. For that, you’ll need predictive scoring, or Spectrum NPS. To get there, download our guide, take our comprehensive training course, or read about the future of NPS.

REPORT

The Complete Guide to NPS Basics and Beyond

TRAINING

Leading an Outcome- Oriented
CX Program

REPORT

The New NPS
Manifesto

REPORT

The Complete Guide to NPS Basics and Beyond

TRAINING

Leading an Outcome- Oriented
CX Program

REPORT

The New NPS Manifesto

ABOUT OCX COGNITION

OCX Cognition delivers the future of NPS. We ensure customer experience success by combining technology and data science with programmatic consulting. In our Insights section, we present a comprehensive and evolving collection of resources based on our research and expertise, collected for CX leaders committed to delivering business outcomes.